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Memorandum of understanding between electronic communications regulators in the Nordic and Baltic countries

The national regulatory authorities for electronic communications in the Nordic and Baltic countries have signed a memorandum of understanding on cooperation in selected areas. The Norwegian Communications Authority (Nkom) is the contracting party for Norway.

The Nordic–Baltic telecom authorities have signed a memorandum of understanding

From the left, the directors of the national regulatory authorities: Hrafnkell Gíslason (Iceland), Katrine Winding (Denmark), Rolands Irklis (Latvia), Feliksas Dobrovolskis (Lithuania), Elisabeth Aarsæther (Norway), Kaur Kajak (Estonia), Dan Sjöblom (Sweden) and Johanna Juusela (Finland)

The Nordic countries have collaborated closely for several years and have, for example, submitted joint input to EU/EEA forums on key issues, including the new European regulatory framework for electronic communications.

This collaboration has worked well, despite the fact that the countries have different EU status: Denmark, Sweden and Finland are members of the EU, while Iceland and Norway are members of the EEA. The Nordic countries all have relatively similar social structures and cultures and often speak with a common voice in discussions of regulatory and consumer issues etc. in European forums.

Last year the three Baltic countries were invited to join this cooperation, and on 24 May a memorandum of understanding was signed in the Latvian capital, Riga.

The cooperation will take place at the highest level between the heads of the electronic communications regulatory authorities in the respective countries. Norway is represented by the Director General of Nkom, Elisabeth Aarsæther.

The Nordic and Baltic countries will continue their practical collaboration linked to preparing and publishing statistics. Comparisons with other countries enable developments in particularly interesting services and consumption patterns to be monitored and compared.

Other areas of cooperation are equipment regulation, frequency management, sector-specific competition regulation and consumer issues. It may also be relevant to collaborate on topics and questions that arise as a result of events or issues affecting several of the countries